Omurice (omelette rice) 蛋包飯

Omurice (omelette rice) is an example of the adaptation of Western dishes to Japanese tastes. It was born in late 1860s during Meiji Restoration when the Emperor declared Western ideas central to Japan’s future progress. The Emperor lifted the ban on red meat and promoted Western cuisine. Among omurice, curry, katsu (breaded cutlets), and hayashi rice (beef stew over rice) are other examples of Western dishes that have gone on to become staple dishes in Japanese home-cooking and casual diners.
For 1 serving of omurise: Use whatever leftover vegetables and meat you have (about 1/3 cup), saute that in a little bit of oil with some rice (about 2/3 cup) for a few minutes until heated through. Season the rice with ketchup, salt and pepper then set aside. In the same pan fry a 2-egg omelette over low heat. Turn the heat off when the top is still a bit runny. Carefully mound the rice mixture down the center of the eggs. The edges of the omelette are folded over the rice in the shape like an American football. Slide the omelette out onto a plate. Spoon more ketchup on top to garnish.

蛋包飯(オムライス)就是一些飯菜被雞蛋緊緊的包圍著,是日本人心目中的童年味道,很多日本媽媽都會弄個蛋包飯給小孩作便當,酸酸甜甜的很開胃。離現在不夠100年的大正時代,當時的飲食文化可說是和洋交錯,盛行的西餐廳員工忙得接不過氣,有時為了省時方便,草草吃點東西就了事,像戰場般的廚房裡,製作員工飯餐最重要是手到拿來,這邊有些雞蛋,那邊有些洋䓤,前面有些用剩的米飯,來個煎煎反反就成了蛋包飯的初型,員工可以站著吃過又繼續工作,又勤又快。時至今日,蛋包飯的進化可說是千變萬化。